Discussion:
Eek! Paternity Again...
(too old to reply)
Pazuzu
2003-11-28 13:56:46 UTC
Permalink
Here goes...

I currently have a CS2 assessment in place in respect of child number
1. There are no problems with figures or payment. The financial side
is OK, however and it is a BIG however, a few weeks ago I was given
some information that leads me to question paternity (this is not
dissimilar to another recent thread, but this time in reverse).

I just got off the phone to Plymouth and, after talking to a nice
young lady called Louise (acting Team Leader), was told that it was
probable that, as I originally accepted paternity, I would not now be
given the opportunity to request a DNA test. She said this was by no
means a definitive answer as she needs to talk to the (currently
unstaffed) paternity section to clarify.

It's quite probable that this is simply another fairy tale from a
disturbed mother out to cause maximum aggravation and avoid pending
legal action, on the other hand, considering that the mother is an
habitual liar with a total aversion to the truth it does lead me to
question my assumption of paternity...

Any clues on where I stand in respect of belatedly requesting a DNA
test, should I choose to do so? (I'm aware that should I in fact be
the father then requesting a DNA test may something that can be used
against me in any legal action, which could explain the reasons behind
her silly games).

Some 'women' just take effin' the biscuit!
Neil Hopkins
2003-11-28 14:11:03 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 28 Nov 2003 13:56:46 +0000, Pazuzu
Post by Pazuzu
Any clues on where I stand in respect of belatedly requesting a DNA
test, should I choose to do so? (I'm aware that should I in fact be
the father then requesting a DNA test may something that can be used
against me in any legal action, which could explain the reasons behind
her silly games).
There have been cases of belated paternity tests resulting in refunds
of any payments made. I don't know if that is still the case under CS2
though.
--
Anya : "I provide much needed sarcasm"
Xbox live : neil hopkins
Note that there is an exclusive spam filter on this email address.
Let me know via this group if you want to be added to my whitelist.
x x
2003-11-28 14:48:09 UTC
Permalink
You can apply at any time through magistrates court for DNA testing - her
cannot stop you, and can solve things once and for all - that, or close the
CSA case.

Martin <><
Post by Pazuzu
Here goes...
I currently have a CS2 assessment in place in respect of child number
1. There are no problems with figures or payment. The financial side
is OK, however and it is a BIG however, a few weeks ago I was given
some information that leads me to question paternity (this is not
dissimilar to another recent thread, but this time in reverse).
I just got off the phone to Plymouth and, after talking to a nice
young lady called Louise (acting Team Leader), was told that it was
probable that, as I originally accepted paternity, I would not now be
given the opportunity to request a DNA test. She said this was by no
means a definitive answer as she needs to talk to the (currently
unstaffed) paternity section to clarify.
It's quite probable that this is simply another fairy tale from a
disturbed mother out to cause maximum aggravation and avoid pending
legal action, on the other hand, considering that the mother is an
habitual liar with a total aversion to the truth it does lead me to
question my assumption of paternity...
Any clues on where I stand in respect of belatedly requesting a DNA
test, should I choose to do so? (I'm aware that should I in fact be
the father then requesting a DNA test may something that can be used
against me in any legal action, which could explain the reasons behind
her silly games).
Some 'women' just take effin' the biscuit!
Tiberius
2003-11-29 10:10:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pazuzu
Here goes...
Your best bet is to, if you can, arrange an unofficial paternity test. You
can do this without the mother's knowledge or involvement as long as you can
get a sample ( we're talking mouth swab or hair here, not surgical removal
of vital appendages) from the child. If the result is positive then at
least you know and you can just keep quiet about it. If the result is
negative, then you can demand an official one knowing what the answer is
going to be.

Whatever your views on the morality of this it is perfectly legal. It is
also a lot less trouble all round than asking for an official one and then
getting a positive result. In the circumstances, I would have thought that
overrides considerations of permission and invasion of privacy. Mind you, I
doubt that anyone on this group is still exercised over those.

T
Pazuzu
2003-11-29 11:44:01 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 29 Nov 2003 10:10:47 -0000 and with nothing better to do
Post by Tiberius
Post by Pazuzu
Here goes...
Your best bet is to, if you can, arrange an unofficial paternity test. You
can do this without the mother's knowledge or involvement as long as you can
get a sample ( we're talking mouth swab or hair here, not surgical removal
of vital appendages) from the child. If the result is positive then at
least you know and you can just keep quiet about it. If the result is
negative, then you can demand an official one knowing what the answer is
going to be.
A buccal swab test? One small problem here... Mum extracts *immense*
pleasure from obstructing contact to the full and by then rubbing ones
nose in it (i.e deliberately parading the child about in front of
myself and, perhaps more shamefully, in front of the grandparents).
However, I do get to see the top of my childs head go past in a
pushchair once in a blue moon, closely followed by a 'woman' (I use
the word under advice) sporting the latest in red ruby slippers with
matching hornéd skull prosthetics. Perhaps I should run out shouting
'Stand & deliver" The DNA or..." etc.? ;o)
Post by Tiberius
Whatever your views on the morality of this it is perfectly legal. It is
also a lot less trouble all round than asking for an official one and then
getting a positive result. In the circumstances, I would have thought that
overrides considerations of permission and invasion of privacy. Mind you, I
doubt that anyone on this group is still exercised over those.
It's a bit of a dilemma. I want to know that I am supporting my child
and not someone else's now that a doubt has been raised, but more
importantly the child, in later life, has the right to know (and no
Freda, I do not simply mean that is it in my sole interest to know, so
don't even go there!).

But should I ever get the opportunity of contact again then I believe
that no matter what others think, the apparent 'immorality' of an
unsanctioned test may be justified, if other avenues have not already
been explored.

On this note I believe that Glasgow Uni' have a good reputation
here...
--
H*ll hath no fury like the psychotic bitch scorned.
x x
2003-11-29 12:19:47 UTC
Permalink
Just be warned - the tests involving only one parent and child are
considered less accurate than when the 2 parents are tested with the child.

So you may get a result that could be read either way (chances in the
hundreds rather than the tens of thousands to one).

Easier to do on a younger child rather than one that blabs their mouth off
to mother about what daddy did.


Martin <><
Post by Tiberius
Post by Pazuzu
Here goes...
Your best bet is to, if you can, arrange an unofficial paternity test.
You
Post by Tiberius
can do this without the mother's knowledge or involvement as long as you can
get a sample ( we're talking mouth swab or hair here, not surgical removal
of vital appendages) from the child. If the result is positive then at
least you know and you can just keep quiet about it. If the result is
negative, then you can demand an official one knowing what the answer is
going to be.
Whatever your views on the morality of this it is perfectly legal. It is
also a lot less trouble all round than asking for an official one and then
getting a positive result. In the circumstances, I would have thought that
overrides considerations of permission and invasion of privacy. Mind you, I
doubt that anyone on this group is still exercised over those.
T
Pazuzu
2003-11-29 13:45:50 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 29 Nov 2003 12:19:47 -0000 and with nothing better to do "x x"
Post by x x
Just be warned - the tests involving only one parent and child are
considered less accurate than when the 2 parents are tested with the child.
I think, should the mother ever agree to having her DNA taken, the
scientific community will discover a hitherto unknown and highly
defective gene pool, probably amoebic in nature. But I could be
mistaken, it could be bacterial.

Seriously though, thanks for the comments.
Post by x x
So you may get a result that could be read either way (chances in the
hundreds rather than the tens of thousands to one).
Easier to do on a younger child rather than one that blabs their mouth off
to mother about what daddy did.
True.
Post by x x
Martin <><
Post by Tiberius
Post by Pazuzu
Here goes...
Your best bet is to, if you can, arrange an unofficial paternity test.
You
Post by Tiberius
can do this without the mother's knowledge or involvement as long as you
can
Post by Tiberius
get a sample ( we're talking mouth swab or hair here, not surgical removal
of vital appendages) from the child. If the result is positive then at
least you know and you can just keep quiet about it. If the result is
negative, then you can demand an official one knowing what the answer is
going to be.
Whatever your views on the morality of this it is perfectly legal. It is
also a lot less trouble all round than asking for an official one and then
getting a positive result. In the circumstances, I would have thought
that
Post by Tiberius
overrides considerations of permission and invasion of privacy. Mind you,
I
Post by Tiberius
doubt that anyone on this group is still exercised over those.
T
Jenny Dunn
2003-12-11 13:55:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pazuzu
Here goes...
I currently have a CS2 assessment in place in respect of child number
1. There are no problems with figures or payment. The financial side
is OK, however and it is a BIG however, a few weeks ago I was given
some information that leads me to question paternity (this is not
dissimilar to another recent thread, but this time in reverse).
I just got off the phone to Plymouth and, after talking to a nice
young lady called Louise (acting Team Leader), was told that it was
probable that, as I originally accepted paternity, I would not now be
given the opportunity to request a DNA test. She said this was by no
means a definitive answer as she needs to talk to the (currently
unstaffed) paternity section to clarify.
It's quite probable that this is simply another fairy tale from a
disturbed mother out to cause maximum aggravation and avoid pending
legal action, on the other hand, considering that the mother is an
habitual liar with a total aversion to the truth it does lead me to
question my assumption of paternity...
Any clues on where I stand in respect of belatedly requesting a DNA
test, should I choose to do so? (I'm aware that should I in fact be
the father then requesting a DNA test may something that can be used
against me in any legal action, which could explain the reasons behind
her silly games).
Some 'women' just take effin' the biscuit!
BBC DOCUMENTARY ON PATERNITY TESTING

Dear all

I'm a researcher for the BBC documentary programme 'Everyman' and I am
looking for people who would be willing to take part in a film we are
doing about paternity tests.

Because it is such a sensitive and emotional subject, contact can be
made in complete confidence and we would not broadcast any aspect of
your experience without prior consent.

We think this is an important film to make because so many are
affected by misattributed fatherhood and yet there is little help
available for those people.

If you would like to contact me, my email address is
***@bbc.co.uk

Best wishes

Jenny

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